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Yarmouth Weather & Climate

  • Forecast & Current Conditions
  • Gray NWS Home Page
  • Weather Radio
  • Portland 3-Day Weather History
  • Weather Spotter Reports
  • Gray Daily Climate Report
  • Gray Climate Records
  • Portland Climate Normals
  • Gray NWS Twitter
  • Caribou NWS Twitter

    Tools & Charts

  • Beaufort Scale
  • Wind Chill Chart
  • Portland Daily 30-Year Normals
  • Weather Forecast Chart
  • Meteorological Conversions
  • Dewpoint Comfort Scale

    Maps & Satellite Graphics

  • Maine Forecast Zone Map
  • HPC
  • National Digital Forecast Database
  • NOAA Environmental Visualization Lab
  • NOAA Weather View
  • Earth
  • Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service
  • WW2010 Surface Products
  • NASA GOES-12 Northeast Satellite
  • Current Snow Pack
  • Daily Snowfall Map
  • Forest Fire Danger
  • Maine Drought Map

    Foul Weather Tools

  • Storm Prediction Center
  • ME Emergency Management Agency

    Hurricane Watch

  • National Hurricane Center
  • Naval Tropical Cyclone Page
  • NHC Atlantic Ops
  • Saffir-Simpson Scale
  • Saffir-Simpson Extended Scale
  • Tropical Cyclone Names
  • Gulf of Maine Bouys
  • Jeff Masters' WUnderground Blog
  • AccuWeather Hurricane Page
  • Weather Channel Tropical Update
  • Tropical Meteorology Project
  • Joint Typhoon Warning Center
  • Tropical Cyclone Rainfall Data

    Winter Weather Watch

  • GYX Winter Weather Information
  • Maine Snow Information Page
  • Snow Pack Page
  • Daily Snowfall Map
  • Wind Chill Chart
  • Winter Safety & Awareness
  • Winter Weather Definitions

    General Weather & Climate

  • Atmos Meteorology Online Guides
  • NOAA Homepage
  • National Climatic Data Center
  • NWS Abbreviations and Acronyms
  • NWS Glossary
  • El Nino Southern Oscillation
  • Old Farmer's Almanac
  • Maine Fall Foliage
  • SnowCrystals.com
  • | Yarmouth Weather & Climate | Tools & Charts |
    | Maps and Satellite Graphics |
    | Foul Weather Tools | Hurricane Watch |
    | Winter Weather Watch |
    | General Weather & Climate Sites |
     
    Yarmouth Weather & Climate

  • Forecast & Current Conditions for Yarmouth
    Current observations from the National Weather Service’s station at Portland International Jetport: wind, sky/weather conditions, temperature, dew point, barometric pressure, and precipitation, and 7-day forecast, with grids pin-pointed to within five miles of Yarmouth.

  • Gray NWS Home Page
    Provides data on Current Hazards, Current Conditions, Radar, Satellite, Forecasts, Climate, Weather Safety for southern and western Maine.

  • Weather Radio
    NOAA Weather Radio is a service of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of the U.S. Department of Commerce. As the "Voice of the National Weather Service", it provides continuous broadcasts of the latest weather information from local National Weather Service offices. Weather messages are repeated every 4 to 7 minutes, and are routinely updated every 1 to 3 hours or more frequently in rapidly changing local weather, or if a nearby hazardous environmental condition exists. This service operates 24 hours a day.

  • Portland 3-Day Weather History
    Hourly observations from the National Weather Service’s station at Portland International Jetport for the current and previous 71 hours: wind, sky/weather conditions, temperature, dew point, barometric pressure, and precipitation.

  • Weather Spotter Reports
    These reports are made by amateur weather observers who have taken the NWS Weather Spotter training course. Covers a wide area of southern and western Maine.

  • Gray Daily Climate Report
    Updates twice daily, usually around 4 A.M. and 4 P.M. The afternoon report shows same-day climate with data up to 4 P.M.; the morning report summarizes for the previous day in its entirety.

  • Gray Climate Records
    This link also has tables for other areas served by the Gray office; please navigate with care.

  • Portland Climate Normals
    The source for the data is U.S. Climate Data. While the site's About Page is not forthcoming about the organization that provides the data, the data itself appears to be authentic. If and when the NWS decides to post this data again in searchable format, we'll revert back to their pages.

  • Gray NWS Twitter
    Official Twitter Account for National Weather Service Portland/Gray, Maine. Twitter feeds are a supplemental service provided by NWS to extend the reach of NWS information. Twitter feeds and tweets do not always reflect the most current information for forecasts, watches, and warnings. For the most current official info, visit.

  • Caribou NWS Twitter
    Official Twitter Account for National Weather Service Caribou. Twitter feeds are a supplemental service provided by NWS to extend the reach of NWS information. Twitter feeds and tweets do not always reflect the most current information for forecasts, watches, and warnings. For the most current official info, visit.

    Tools & Charts

  • Beaufort Scale
    Called “science turned into poetry,” this 19th Century chart for determining wind speed by observing its effect on smoke, trees, and buildings is still used today by amateur and professional alike.

  • Wind Chill Chart
    While scoffed at by many professionals, this scale is nonetheless a useful formula for calculating the dangers from winter winds and freezing temperatures. This chart is from the National Weather Service Office of Climate, Water, and Weather Services; used wisely, it could save your life – or at least a digit.

  • Portland Daily 30-Year Normals
    Tables showing the normal high and low temperatures in Portland, Maine, for each day of each month.

  • Weather Forecast Chart
    With a barometer, a Beaufort Scale, and an eye to the sky, you can predict the weather. This table, a web version of the one that appears in Paul Lehr’s classic book “Weather: A [Golden Science] Guide To Phenomena and Forecasts,” was created by a kindred spirit in Massachussets whose own website has been rendered nearly useless by his internet host. We’ve provided a copy on our own site, to which this link points.

  • Common Meteorological Conversions
    Calculators for
  • Temperature (Fahrenheit to Celsius to Kelvin)
  • Wind Chill
  • Heat Index
  • Wind Speed (Miles/hour to kilometers/hour to meters/second to knots)
  • Relative Humidity
  • Barometric Pressure (millibars to inches to millimeters)
  • Precipitation (hundreths of an inch to inches to millimeters to centimeters)
    This site also presents tables for many of the above conversions.

  • Dewpoint Comfort Scale
    This creation by our correspondent, L.M., is a useful guide to understanding how dewpoint, rather than relative humidity, is a better index to how the amount of moisture in the air will make you feel.

    Maps & Satellite Graphics

  • Maine Forecast Zone Map
    Shows the NWS Forecast Zones, with their numbers.

  • Hydrometeorological Prediction Center
    Recently renamed the Weather Prediction Center, the HPC is used by weather professionals, but is also useful to the informed amateur. The QPF (Quantitative Precipitation Forecast) maps on the homepage are especially useful when heavy rain or snow is forecast, and require no knowledge of meteorology to interpret.

  • National Digital Forecast Database
    The National Digital Forecast Database (NDFD) consists of gridded forecasts of sensible weather elements (e.g., cloud cover, maximum temperature). NDFD contains a seamless mosaic of digital forecasts from NWS field offices working in collaboration with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP).

  • Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service
    Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service is a web-based suite of accurate and information-rich forecast products. They display the magnitude and uncertainty of occurrence of floods or droughts, from hours to days and months, in advance.

  • NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory
    Animations and images featuring NOAA's remotely-sensed data

  • NOAA Weather View
    The global winds visualization uses a tracers technique to show the speed and direction of winds across the planet. In addition, other imagery and data can be co-displayed.

  • Earth
    An animated map of global wind, weather, and ocean conditions.

  • WW2010 Surface Products
    U. S. maps for Temperature, Dew Point, Barometric Pressure, and Weather Observations with or without InfraRed Satellite pictures. A product of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign’s Department of Atmospheric Sciences. Use these colorful maps to observe air masses nationwide and foresee their movements to your own corner of the world.

  • NASA GOES-12 Northeast Satellite
    GOES-12 is the geostationary satellite which hovers over the east coast, beaming back visible, infrared, and water vapor images 24 hours a day. The main map is “clickable” for a close-up picture and can be animated. For more on the kinds of images and how to interpret them, select “More about these images” under the picture. For a tour of all the buttons and symbols, be sure to read “Usage tips.”

  • Current Snow Pack
    Daily graphical report of the height of snow on the ground statewide.

  • Daily Snowfall Map
    Daily graphical report of snowfall, ending 1200 UTC (aka, GMT), updated daily.

  • Maine Forest Service Forest Fire Danger Report
    Daily graphical report displaying the fire danger in all zones across Maine. The ratings are explained in a link at the bottom of the page.

  • Maine Drought Map The U.S. Drought Monitor, established in 1999, is a weekly map of drought conditions that is produced jointly by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the National Drought Mitigation Center (NDMC) at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. The U.S. Drought Monitor website is hosted and maintained by the NDMC.The U.S. Drought Monitor, a composite index that includes many indicators, is the drought map that policymakers and media use in discussions of drought and in allocating drought relief.

    Foul Weather Tools (See also Hurricane Watch, below)

  • Storm Prediction Center
    The Storm Prediction Center is part of the National Weather Service and provides timely and accurate forecasts and watches for severe thunderstorms and tornadoes over the contiguous United States. The SPC also monitors heavy rain, heavy snow, and fire weather events across the U.S. and issues specific products for those hazards.

  • Maine Emergency Management Agency
    Home page for the state agency that deals with all emergencies, not just weather-related. The Weather Information page repackages National Weather Service information as it pertains to potential threats such as severe storms and flooding, etc.

    Hurricane Watch
    Note: some of these sites are also useful for other types of foul weather awareness.

  • National Hurricane Center
    This is the source of official information for tropical storms. Commercial sites may offer useful information, but if life and limb are at risk, accept no substitutes. The National Hurricane Center maintains a continuous watch on tropical cyclones from May 15th in the eastern Pacific and June 1st in the Atlantic through November 30. The Center prepares and issues forecasts, watches and warnings within text advisories and graphical products. There is also much useful information about hurricanes in the “Learn About Hurricanes” section, as well as informative historical data in the “Hurricane History” section.

  • Naval Research Laboratory Monterey Marine Meteorology Division Tropical Cyclone Page
    With a name like that, it can only be a government site, and indeed, this is the Navy’s tropical cyclone (hurricane and typhoon) watch site. Great satellite pictures of the storms and solid data and forecast information. Site design looks like the control panel for a battleship, but once you have learned its navigation, you’ll be docking your mouse like an admiral.

  • NHC Atlantic Ops
    National Hurricane Center's twitter account, providing analyses, forecasts, and warnings of tropical cyclones and disturbances over the Atlantic basin.

  • Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale
    The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale is a 1 to 5 rating based on a hurricane's sustained wind speed. This scale estimates potential property damage. Hurricanes reaching Category 3 and higher are considered major hurricanes because of their potential for significant loss of life and damage. Category 1 and 2 storms are still dangerous, however, and require preventative measures. In the western North Pacific, the term "super typhoon" is used for tropical cyclones with sustained winds exceeding 150 mph.

  • Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale Extended Table
    Table shows each category of hurricane and lists the consequences of damage in terms of People, Livestock, and Pets; Mobile Homes; Frame Homes; Apartments, Shopping Centers, and Industrial Buildings; High-Rise Windows and Glass; Signage, Fences, and Canopies; Trees; Power and Water.

  • Tropical Cyclone Names
    Since 1953, Atlantic tropical storms had been named from lists originated by the National Hurricane Center. They are now maintained and updated through a strict procedure by an international committee of the World Meteorological Organization. The six lists on this page are used in rotation and re-cycled every six years, i.e., the 2016 list will be used again in 2022. The only time that there is a change in the list is if a storm is so deadly or costly that the future use of its name on a different storm would be inappropriate for reasons of sensitivity.

  • Gulf of Maine Bouys
    While principally of use to mariners and those who make their living off the sea, the information on this site can be enlightening to landlubbers during storm activity and when ocean weather such as onshore winds affects them most directly.

  • Jeff Masters' WUnderground Blog
    Dr. Jeff Masters co-founded Weather Underground in 1995, and flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

  • AccuWeather Hurricane Page

  • Weather Channel Tropical Update
    Commercial sites such as AccuWeather’s and the Weather Channel’s can be a rich source of information for the more casual weather observer, because the information is presented less technically and the site layout can be more easily navigated. We nonetheless advise our readers to not be fooled by the more frequent “updates” these sites offer during storms -- they’re using the same tools the more cautious National Hurricane Center is using -- and to rely on the NHC, local National Weather Service, and local emergency broadcast system services when life and limb are at stake.

  • Tropical Meteorology Project
    The Tropical Meteorology Project is headed by Colorado State University’s Dr. William Gray, who for more than 40 years has investigated meso-scale tropical weather phenomena, specializing in the global aspects of tropical cyclones. The site offers Gray’s annual Tropical Storm Forecast, probabilities of landfalling tropical cyclones along the United States coastline from Brownsville, TX to Eastport, ME, and other weather products, research, and articles from TMP and other Colorado State University researchers.

  • Joint Typhoon Warning Center
    Located at Naval Base Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) is the U.S. Department of Defense agency responsible for issuing tropical cyclone warnings for the Pacific and Indian Oceans. Official JTWC support is provided to all branches of the U.S. Department of Defense, and other U.S. government departments and their agencies such as the State Department (U.S. Embassies and Consulates), and the Department of Commerce (U.S. National Weather Service). JTWC products are intended for use by operational units in making decisions on ship movements, aircraft sorties and operational planning and by other government agencies in their respective support and international cooperation roles.

  • Tropical Cyclone Rainfall Data
    Data is available for tropical and subtropical cyclones that impacted the U.S. from 1963 onward to the present, and Mexico between 1995 and 2003, as well as some older historic storms.

    Winter Weather Watch

  • GYX Winter Weather Information
    When a storm is approaching, start here.

  • Maine Snow Information and Forecasts
    Just about everything you need to know about Maine snow.

  • Snow Pack Page
    Just how deep is it? This map of the state shows on-the-ground snow depths across the state.

  • Daily Snowfall Map
    Daily graphical report of snowfall, ending 1200 UTC (aka, GMT), updated daily.

  • Wind Chill Chart
    While scoffed at by many professionals, this scale is nonetheless a useful formula for calculating the dangers from winter winds and freezing temperatures. This chart is from the National Weather Service Office of Climate, Water, and Weather Services; used wisely, it could save your life – or at least a digit.

  • Winter Safety & Awareness
    Know how to deal with winter weather, how to understand forecasts and warnings, how to be prepared for being out in winter’s worst – even unexpectedly. Also some fascinating information on how climatic forces in the tropics affect weather at the mid-latitudes, and there are some stories about the “Billion Dollar Winter Storms” (and you thought only hurricanes could rack up a bill?).

  • Winter Weather Criteria & Definitions
    Terms used in forecasts. Are you sure you know the difference between a Winter Storm Watch and a Warning? Snow showers and flurries? Sleet and freezing rain? This involves more than just splitting frosty hairs; the distinctions can make the difference between a wise and foolish decision that could change your life.

    General Weather & Climate Sites
    These sites are recommended for general information and for deepening one's understanding of meteorology and climatology.

  • Atmos Meteorology Online Guides
    Teach yourself meteorology! The Online Guides use multimedia technology and the dynamic capabilities of the web. These resources incorporate text, colorful diagrams, animations, computer simulations, audio and video to introduce topics and concepts for a wide variety of disciplines. The target audience for the Online Guides is high school and undergraduate level students. However, these resources have been used by instructors throughout K-12, undergraduate and graduate level education. A product of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign’s Department of Atmospheric Sciences.

  • NOAA Homepage
    A publication of the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration. The grand-daddy of the other National Weather Service weather sites we post here. Contains forecast and advisory information about active weather, achives of weather and climate information, news articles, and more.

  • National Climatic Data Center
    NCDC is the world’s largest active archive of weather data. NCDC produces numerous climate publications and responds to data requests from all over the world. The repository of OFFICIAL records and argument-settling data. Not the most user-friendly site ever made, nor is everything free, but the determined miner will find a rich lode.

  • National Weather Service Abbreviations and Acronyms
    While some creative writers make up their own, these are the ones commonly used in NWS Forecast Discussions.

  • NWS Glossary
    Browsable and searchable database of terms used in NWS Forecast Discussions.

  • Nino/Nina Southern Oscillation
    Perhaps the best-known arm of NOAA's Climate Prediction Center, ENSO tracks observations of El Nino & La Nina and makes climate predictions based on that data. This page also includes a wealth of information about El Nino & La Nina – scientific, historical, etc.

  • Old Farmer’s Almanac
    The original. Often imitated, never equalled. Now online -- with its own hole (though we haven’t an ether-hook to hang it on).

  • Maine Fall Foliage
    The Official Fall Foliage site, powered by the Maine Department of Conservation. The foliage reports – with free online help – begin in mid-September each year, but the site has information and photos all year 'round.

  • SnowCrystals.com
    This site is all about snow crystals and snowflakes -- what they are, where they come from, and just how these remarkably complex and beautiful structures are created, quite literally, out of thin air.

  • The original material on this site is copyright © 2003 - 2016 by Colby Quid. All rights reserved.◊
    The information on this site is for informational and educational purposes only. No warranties are made express or implied about the accuracy, timeliness, merit, or value of the information provided, and the editor shall not be held liable for any losses caused by reliance on the accuracy, reliability or timeliness of such information. Portions of the information may be incorrect or not current. Any person or entity that relies on any information obtained from this site does so at his or her own risk. No responsibility is assumed for any problems associated with the use of products, services or commercial information mentioned in this web site. No endorsement of products or companies is intended, nor is criticism of unnamed products or companies implied.◊